“MONSTERS AND THE MILITARY” and 4 More Dark, True Stories! #WeirdDarkness


Throughout history the battlefields of our bloody wars have been saturated with all manner of tales of valor, bravery, cruelty, and tragedy. These are part of the fabric of war, an intrinsic property of it, and this tapestry of death infuses our history with its grim shadow. Often overshadowed by the atrocity and gloom of war there are often other bizarre stories scattered about and buried within this history, and war seems to bring about it stories of strange entities, creatures, and mysteries as well, with some of these things being just as sinister and scary as any enemy.

“THE CONSPIRACY OF STANLEY KUBRICK, ‘THE SHINING’, AND THE MOON LANDING” and more! #WeirdDarkness


If American filmmaker Stanley Kubrick is not the greatest director of all time, as many critics believe, he is certainly one of the most mysterious. Basing himself in London from the 1960s, the reclusive Kubrick turned out a string of classic films; Dr. Strangelove, 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange and Eyes Wide Shut, characterized by their dark humor, dense subtexts, and visual innovation. Kubrick’s work has exerted both an immense influence on other filmmakers and considerable impact on our wider popular culture. But as time went on, the gaps between each film grew longer, as the meticulous Kubrick begun to obsess over ever detail of his work. Each film became the culmination of years of preparation, the ostensible story and plots becoming secondary to Kubrick’s more esoteric concerns. Perhaps more than any other filmmaker, Kubrick’s work is analyzed for its hidden meanings. The director’s classic 1968 science fiction epic 2001: A Space Odyssey often appears on film critics all time best lists. It’s exploration of mankind’s evolution been guided by an alien force revolutionized film special effects. But it was more than just a technical feat, it was a work of art exploring metaphysical concepts using visual metaphors and symbolism. Of all Kubrick’s film, the one that has captured the public imagination more than any other appears to be his simplest. At its release in 1980, many wondered why the great filmmaker had chosen to adapt a straightforward horror novel by Stephen King… The Shining. The film puzzled critics and King himself hated it for making inexplicable changes to his source material. But perhaps there is a reason Kubrick made so many changes… and that is to insert hints to close watchers of the film, of a larger, incredible real-world secret. Could Kubrick have been using “The Shining” to try and expose something the government had covered up?