Zoologist Fired For Believing In Loch Ness Monster

Zoologist Fired For Believing In Loch Ness Monster

Zoologist Fired For Believing In Loch Ness Monster

New documents have revealed the truth behind the sacking of Dr Denys Tucker from London’s Natural History Museum.

Dr. Tucker had been a highly respected zoologist at the prestigious museum for years, but when he was unceremoniously sacked from his role as the museum’s principal scientific officer in 1960, the precise explanation for his alleged ‘insubordination’ would remain a topic of speculation for more than 60 years.
Now though, newly released documents have finally confirmed that, despite his impressive academic achievements and reputation – Dr. Tucker had been removed from his position solely for the reason that he believed that the Loch Ness Monster was real.
Months before his sacking, he wrote about the monster in New Scientist magazine, prompting senior figures at the museum to express concerns about potential reputational damage.
“The trustees wish it to be known that they do not approve of the spending of official time or official leave on the so-called Loch Ness Phenomenon,” a memo issued in 1959 reads.
“If, as a result of the activities of members of the staff, the museum is involved in undesirable publicity, [the trustees] will be gravely displeased.'”
Dr. Tucker was ultimately sacked on the basis of “continued, vexatious, insubordinate and generally offensive conduct towards the museum’s director and other senior staff.”
In reality, he had simply been attempting to secure funding in an effort to investigate the monster.
“I put the project up to the Natural History Museum,” he was quoted as saying at the time. “The museum does send out expeditions to collect specimens. But they didn’t like the idea of a Loch Ness expedition at all.”
“They refused me leave to lecture on the subject. Since I was sacked, they have banned me from the library. I had an international reputation as a zoologist. Now I’m like a struck off lawyer.”

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